All-inclusive Bully Reporting Guide

Introduction

This reporting guide was born from necessity

While researching the problem, we saw no one-stop place where one could obtain all the information needed to:

  • Structure & Organize evidence
  • Access all knowledge (tips and tricks) needed to bullies
  • Present the manner using meaningful methods that authorities need & will use
  • Offer links to all of the major bully reporting areas in different regions of world

We make no assumptions that you are computer savvy. We offer step-by-step instructions how to do everything you need to fully structure (organize) and report to various groups within many different regions.

Reporting Necessary Evidence is Expected

Report

When cyberbullying happens, it is important to document and report the behavior so it can be addressed.

Steps to Take Immediately

Quick jump to America’s reporting section

Quick jump to Australia’s reporting section

The 2 buttons below will show you how to capture screens in Windows & Apple/MAC OS X.

You must choose (click Windows or Apple / MAC) buttons below in order to see the contents.

Windows Screen Captures (click me)

The police will want to see your evidence so we suggest you use some screen capturing methods to make this task easier for all. You will definitely want to pay close attention to these instructions shown below.


Here’s how to take screen shots if you’re running Windows 7 and up. Anyone running Windows XP or Vista can check out earlier look at screen shots to see what tools are available.


The Classic: Full Screen

The most common screenshot allows you to capture the full screen. On all versions of Windows, this is accomplished by pressing the PrtScn key. What this does is it puts the entire screen capture on your system clipboard. Then you have to paste whatever’s there into a graphics program such as Microsoft Paint or Gimp for Windows. The easiest way to paste is to tap Ctrl + V at the same time. If you’d rather use the mouse, Gimp stores the paste command under Edit > Paste, while Paint offers a clipboard icon under the Home tab. To start Paint hold Windows key  + S and then start typing Paint. The Paint App will be found where you will paste it via Ctrl + V or open Paint and look at top left where it says “Paste” – choose clipboard and then save as PNG format to your specific evidence folder location (explained more below).

Windows 8 and Windows 10 users have an additional trick that is a little faster. Tap the Windows key + PrtScn and your display will “blink” as if the shutter of a camera just closed and opened. That indicates that a screenshot has been taken. This time, however, you don’t have to paste it into another program. Instead, the shot is automatically saved in Pictures > Screenshots.

If you’re using a Windows tablet, you can also use the auto-save screenshot feature by tapping the Windows button + volume down.

Keep in mind that if you are using multiple displays then the full screenshot will capture all working monitors.

A Single Window

This method hasn’t changed much since it first debuted. If you want to take a screenshot of a single window, first make it the active window by clicking its title bar (the top). Once it’s ready to go tap Alt + PrtScn at the same time. As with hitting just PrtScn this copies the active window as an image to your clipboard. It’s then up to you to paste it into a program as with the regular PrtScn trick.

Apple / MAC Screen captures (click me)

The police will want to see your evidence so we suggest you use some screen capturing methods to make this task easier for all. You will definitely want to pay close attention to these instructions shown below.


Here’s how to take screen shots if you’re running MAC OS X and others.

Quick Summary

1. Ensure that the screen is exactly how you want it. ↓
2. Press Command + Shift + 3. ↓
3. Find your screenshot on your desktop. ↓

Make sure your screen displays exactly what you want to show in your screenshot image. Ensure all the relevant windows are visible.


Press Command + Shift + 3. If your sound is on, your computer should make a brief camera shutter noise.

Find your screenshot on your desktop. It will be saved as “screenshot” labeled with the date and time.

  • Earlier versions of OS X will save it as “Picture #”—for example, if it’s the 5th screenshot on your desktop it will be labeled “Picture 5”. In this case, you may want to change the name of the file to include the date and time when you created this file.
  • Note: we recommend that you do not change the name of the file if you are using MAC OS X because it automatically added the time/date stamp for you and this is exactly what the police will need to get their evidence correctly.

Structural Folders Organization

Windows

Step 1

Go to the area where you want to create the folder.

  • You can open File Explorer by clicking the Start menu
    Image titled Windowsstart.png

    and type in “file explorer”, and then click

    Image titled WindowsFileExplorer.png

    File Explorer at the top of the Start menu. From there, you can select any folder to open from the left-hand pane.

Step 2

Right-click on a blank space. Doing so opens a drop-down menu. Make sure you don’t right-click on a file or folder instead, as this will open the wrong drop-down menu.

  • If you’re in an existing folder (e.g., Documents), you can also click the Home tab on the top-left side of the File Explorer window and click New Folder in the toolbar that appears.
  • If you’re on a computer with a trackpad instead of a mouse, click the trackpad with two fingers to perform a right-click.

Step 3

Select New. This option is near the bottom of the drop-down menu and opens another pop-out menu.

Step 4

Click Folder. It’s at the top of the pop-out menu.

Step 5

Type in a name for your folder and press  Enter. This creates the folder with its new name.

  • The folder’s name cannot contain any special punctuation or other characters.
  • If you don’t type in a name, your folder will be saved as “New Folder”.

Apple / MAC

Step 1

Go to the area where you want to create the folder. Your Mac’s desktop is usually the easiest place to create a folder, but you can create a folder almost anywhere.

  • You can open Finder, which resembles a blue face at the bottom of the screen, and then go to any place you want to make a new folder, such as Documents.

Step 2

Click File. This menu item is in the upper-left side of your Mac’s screen.

Step 3

Click New Folder. This creates a new folder in your current location.

  • You can also right-click on an empty space using a mouse or click using two fingers on a computer with a trackpad. Make sure you don’t right-click on a file or folder instead, as this will open the wrong drop-down menu.

Step 4

Type in a name for your folder and press  Return. This creates the new folder with its new name.

  • You cannot use the “:” or “?” characters when naming a folder on a Mac.

Learn cut, copy and paste

What’s the difference between copying and cutting?

We teach you cut, copy and paste.

You can think of it like an actual piece of paper, for example a letter. When you photocopy the letter, it creates a duplicate and the original stays intact. Cutting a block of text out of the letter, on the other hand, removes that portion from the letter.

On your computer, when you copy a file, image, text or other item, it creates a duplicate of that item in your computer’s temporary memory.

Cutting an item will remove it from the page or folder and hold it in memory, as above.

For our purposes below, you won’t do any cutting. We will only use the Copy method.


Highlight or Select What You Want to Copy or Cut

First, select the item you want to copy or cut:

  • If it’s a file in a folder that you want to copy (to duplicate) or cut (to move) into another folder, click on the file to select it. To select multiple files at once, hold down the Control (CTRL) key (on Windows) or the Command key (on older Macs, it’s the Apple logo; on newer Macs, it’s this curly-do: ⌘) while clicking the other files.
  • For images, right-click on the image, then click on “Copy” or “Copy Image” depending on the application.
  • If you want to copy some text, highlight it by clicking just before the first letter you want to copy, hold down the mouse button while dragging your mouse to the right, and then releasing after you have selected your text.

Tip: In some applications, like Thunderbird and many others, you can select all the text and images by right-clicking and choosing “Select All“.


Please don’t use Microsoft’s Office WORD processor. Use simple text editor and save as plain TEXT only.

Please note: we must make certain we are in text mode, we don’t want to capture any HTML code. So, remember always use a text editor like Notepad or some other straight text editor. NEVER USE MICROSOFT’s OFFICE WORD processor to handle any of this header informational text.

If you are using Mac:
TextEdit opens a new document in rich text mode by default, but you can easily convert a document to plain text at any time. To do so, make sure the document you wish to convert is open and selected, then go to Format > Make Plain Text in the TextEdit menu bar.

Highlight or Select What You Want to Copy

First, select the item you want to copy:

In order to copy text, highlight it by clicking just before the first letter you want to copy, hold down the mouse button while dragging your mouse to the right, and then releasing after you have selected your text.

Tip: In some applications, like Thunderbird and many others, you can select all the text and images by right-clicking and choosing “Select All“. When you paste in straight text, the images will simply go away and you get only the text needed.

Select your items to copy or cut as above. To select all items on a page or folder, you can use the CTRL+A or Command + A shortcut: hold down the CTRL button (on Windows) or Command key (on Mac) then hit the A key.

Then hit these keys together to copy and paste them:

Windows: Hold down the CTRL key then click

C to copy

V to paste

Mac: Hold down the Command key (⌘). Then, as with Windows, click:

C to copy

V to paste

The Drag-and-Drop Method

You can also use your mouse to quickly drag and drop your selected text, image or file from one application to another. For example, you can have two Windows Explorer windows open side by side and drag a file from one to the other to copy it over.

Select the item as in the first step.

Press and hold down your mouse button to “grab” it.

Then move your mouse to the other window and release the button.

Note: Pay attention to the icon or prompt when you hover your mouse over the new window/location: it should tell you whether the item will be copied (duplicated).

Once you get the hang of dragging and dropping or hitting CTRL + C and CTRL + V (or the Command counterparts), you’ll be copying and pasting like a pro.

Now that you have your folders organized, you are ready to start obtaining the necessary info needed to report your problem to police and other agencies.  Click below to find your web-based email provider or use a standalone email client like Thunderbird or Outlook. Once you expand the selection, you will find step-by-processes for all of the major email clients in the world.  We will show you how to collect all of their email headers for your report.  Please remember to Paste, then save it as new TEXT file to your “Mail headers” within your “Bullying Evidence” folder.

Report Cyberbullying to Online Service Providers

Cyberbullying often violates the terms of service established by social media sites and Internet service providers.

  • Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities sections. These describe content that is or is not appropriate.
  • Visit social media safety centers to learn how to block users and change settings to control who can contact you.
  • Report cyberbullying to the social media site so they can act against users abusing the terms of service.

Don’t forget, the authorities will need the email headers for the offending mail(s), if email was used.

To learn how to get the email headers, we have made quite an easy list for you.  See more below, make sure you expand the sections to see the entire lists.

Click the buttons below to expand (or collapse) much more info

Get Email headers of major email clients in the world - click to expand or collapse

AOL

  1. Log in to your AOL account.
  2. Open the email you want to see the headers for.
  3. In the “Action” menu, select View Message Source.
  4. The headers will show in a new window.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Apple Mail (Mac)

  1. Open Apple Mail.
  2. Open the email you want to see the headers for.
  3. Click View and then Message and then All Headers.
  4. The headers will show in the window below your inbox.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Apple Mail 2.x (Mac)

  1. Open Apple Mail.
  2. Select the message you want to view the headers of.
  3. Press SHIFT-COMMAND-H to toggle full headers for the message.
    (Alternatively you can click VIEW in the menu bar, click MESSAGE, click LONG HEADERS.
  4. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Eudora

  1. To begin, open the email message in a new window by double-clicking on it.
  2. Click on the tool bar icon labeled blah, blah, blah .
  3. Copy the headers by right clicking, selecting all and then choose copy.
  4. Choose Edit > Copy.
  5. Close the Message Source box.

Excite Webmail

  1. Log in to your Excite account.
  2. Open the email you want to see the headers for.
  3. Click View Full Headers.
  4. The headers will show in a new window.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Gmail

  1. From a browser, open Gmail.
  2. Open the email you want to check the headers for.
  3. Next to Reply click the Down arrow.
  4. Click Show original.
  5. The headers will show in a new window, including fields like authentication results.
    To get the full message heade infor, copy everything below “Download original.”
  6. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Horde Webmail

  1. Log into Horde Webmail.
  2. Open the email message.
  3. Click the “Message Source” link in the text menu at the top of the message.
  4. A new window, with the full message and headers, will open.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Hotmail / MSN (replaced with Windows Live)

  1. See Full Email Headers in Windows Live Hotmail
  2. Open the desired email in Windows Live Hotmail.
  3. Click the down arrow next to Reply in the message’s header area near the sender and subject.
  4. Pick View message source from the menu.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Lotus Notes –

Lotus Notes v.4.x

  1. Look for the first line that begins with “Received”. There should be a blank line just above it.
  2. Then, scroll down to the next blank line. The data in-between the two blank lines are the headers you need.
  3. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Lotus Notes v.5.x

  1. Open your inbox
  2. Highlight the message that you wish to get header information for.
  3. Choose File -> Export
  4. Type in a filename, leave the type as “Structured Text” and click Export
  5. From the Dialog Box that comes up, choose “Selected Documents” and click OK
  6. Now you can open that message you saved in WordPad and Cut and Paste it.

Mac OS X Mail

  1. To begin, open the email message in a new window by double-clicking on it.
  2. View > Message > Raw Source
  3. Copy the headers by right clicking, selecting all and then choosing copy.
  4. Close the Message Source box.

Microsoft Entourage

  1. Open Entourage.
  2. Double-click to open the email message.
  3. Select View from the menu and click on Internet Headers.
  4. You may need to use your mouse to pull down on the line below the header so that the entire header is visible.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Microsoft Exchange

  1. Click the “File” menu
  2. Click “Properties
  3. Click the “Details” tab
  4. Click “Message Source
  5. Highlight, copy everything in the “Message Source” windows
  6. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Mozilla

  1. Open Mozilla.
  2. Open the email you want to see the headers for.
  3. Click View and then  Message Source. 
  4. The headers will show in a new window.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Mozilla Thunderbird 2.x (Win)

  1. Open Mozilla Thunderbird.
  2. Select the message you want to view the headers of.
  3. Press CTRL-U (or click VIEW from the menu bar, select MESSAGE SOURCE)
  4. Headers will be displayed in a new window..
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Opera

  1. Open Opera.
  2. Click the email you want to see the headers for so it shows in the window below your inbox.
  3. Right click the body of the email.
  4. Click View All Headers and Message.
  5. The headers will show in the window below.
  6. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Outlook (general)

  1. Open Outlook.
  2. Open (double click) the email you want to see the headers for.
    It should open/launch in a separate window.
  3. Click File and then Properties.
  4. The headers will show in the “Internet headers” box.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Outlook 2016, 2013 and 2010

  1. Double click on the email message so that it is opened in its own window.
  2. On the Message tab, in the Options section there is a little button with an arrow in it.
  3. Click on it and you have the message options menu with the internet headers in the bottom section.
  4. This will bring up the Message Options window. The last component of this is the Internet Headers.
  5. Right-click inside the headers and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  6. Close the Message Options window.

Outlook 2007

  1. Double click on the email message so that it is opened in its own window.
  2. If you are new to Outlook 2007, you will be working on what is called the Ribbon.
  3. This is a series of tabs across the top of the message, Message, Developer etc.
  4. On the Message tab, in the Options section there is a little button with an arrow in it.
  5. Click on it and you have the message options menu with the internet headers in the bottom section.
  6. This will have brought up the Message Options window. The last component of this is the Internet Headers.
  7. Right-click inside the headers and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  8. Close the Message Options window.

Outlook 2003

  1. To begin, open the email message in a new window by double-clicking on it.
  2. On this new window menu, go to View -> Options. If you do not see options, you may have to reveal it by clicking on the two down arrows at the bottom of the menu.
  3. This will have brought up the Message Options window. The last component of this is the Internet Headers. Right-click inside the headers and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  4. Close the Message Options window.

Outlook 2002

  1. Open the message you’d like to view headers for.
  2. Click Options from the drop-down menu.
  3. A box called Message Options pops up.
  4. Near the bottom of the box you’ll see a text area titled Internet headers.
  5. Right-click inside the headers and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  6. Close the Message Source box.

Outlook 2000

  1. Open the message you’d like to view headers for.
  2. Select Options, then Full Headers.
  3. Right-click inside the headers and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  4. Close the Message Source box.

Outlook 98

  1. Open the message you’d like to view headers for.
  2. Click Options from the drop-down menus.
  3. Near the bottom of the screen you’ll see a section titled Internet Headers.
  4. Right-click inside the headers and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  5. Close the Message Source box.

Outlook 97

  1. To view headers in Outlook 97, it may require the update: Internet Mail Enhancement Patch. This update is included in Office 97 SR-1. Learn more here.
  2. If you already have the update or just installed it, open any message and look for Internet headers on the Options tab. If you don’t see the Options tab, choose View | Message Header to display it.
  3. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Outlook.com

  1. To get access to full message headers in Outlook Mail on web (Outlook.com):
  2. Locate the email whose headers you want to examine in the message list.
  3. Rught click the message you need.
  4. Select View message source from the context menu that has appeared.
  5. The header lines are all from the very top of the Message source display to the first empty line.
  6. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.
  7. When you are done, click Close.

Outlook Express

  1. Open Outlook Express.
  2. Right click the email you want to see the headers for.
  3. Click Properties.
  4. Click the Details tab.
  5. The headers will show in the box that pops up.
  6. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Outlook Express for Macintosh

  1. Select the email.
  2. Choose View and then choose Source.
  3. A new window will appear containing the email with full headers.
  4. Press command + A, to select all, then command + C to copy.

Pegasus Mail

  1. In the New Mail or other folder window:
  2. Right click the message, and select Message Properties.
  3. In the right hand column uncheck the box beside Contains HTML data.
  4. Click OK. That should allow you to see the message as a text message only.
  5. Click Ctrl-H to bring up the full headers.
  6. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Windows Live Hotmail (Full Version)

  1. This does not work with Safari on Mac OS X
  2. Right click on the message. (From the list of emails)
  3. Select “View Source
  4. A new window with the full headers and HTML source of the email will open
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Yahoo Mail “New” Version

  1. Right click on the message.
  2. Select “View Full Headers
  3. A new window with the full headers will open
  4. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Yahoo Mail “Classic” Version

  1. Click on the message.
  2. Click “Full Headers” on the bottom right of the screen
  3. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Yahoo! Mail

  1. Log in to your Yahoo! Mail account.
  2. Select the email you want to see the headers for.
  3. Click More and then View Raw Message.
  4. The headers will show in a new window.
  5. Right-click and choose Select All, then right-click again and choose Copy.

Click button below to expand Social Media reporting links and info

Get Social media reporting links - click to expand or collapse

Click button below to expand Social Media reporting links and info

Facebook

They do not tolerate bullying or abuse and say that once they are aware of it, they will remove bullying content and may disable the account of anyone who is bullying another. They adhere to a set of Community Standards (https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards/) which include that will not tolerate:

  • Pages that identify and shame private individuals
  • Images that have been altered to degrade private individuals
  • Photos or videos of physical bullying posted to shame the victim
  • Sharing personal information to blackmail or harass people
  • Repeatedly targeting other people with unwanted friend requests or messages

Using the Report Links which appear on the page, you can report bullying to Facebook. A ‘drop down arrow’ should appear giving you a menu option to report the image, post or comment.
You can un-friend or block a person from Facebook. Click on their profile, on the message drop-down you will see the option to ‘un-friend’ and/or ‘block’.

See the full Facebook report here.


Google+

Google Plus Is Gone (for Consumers)

Business users will get more features instead, but this company still hasn’t solved the social media market.

Last updated: Oct 8, 2018 at 9:09PM
Internet giant Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL) is pulling the plug on its Google Plus social network. That is, Google Plus won’t be a social network for the general public anymore, but the service will stick around for corporate users.Chances are, you won’t lose a lot of sleep over this move. That’s part of the problem, since Alphabet cited weak consumer interest in the service, but it took a security breach to finally shut this platform down.

What happened?

Om Monday, Alphabet’s VP of engineering, Ben Smith, announced the end of Google Plus as we know it.

The company has been reviewing the privacy and security implications of its developer access programs all year long. The first findings from this effort included the fact that users want detailed control over who is reading their personal data from Gmail and SMS accounts, inspiring the company to tighten the rules around that access.

But the review also found evidence of a previously unknown bug in Google Plus, which gave some apps access to more user information than expected. Grab a list of John Doe’s friends, and you could also access John’s email address, age, and other demographic data that he had marked as “private.”

The bug was immediately patched, way back in March, and there were no signs that developers were abusing the extra-deep data access. At the same time, this discovery also opened Alphabet’s eyes to the security challenges inherent in running a social platform with deep-rooted access to user data. That’s why the bell is tolling for Google Plus today:

“Given these challenges and the very low usage of the consumer version of Google+, we decided to sunset the consumer version of Google+,” Smith’s blog post said.

 

What’s next?

Alphabet will give consumers 10 months to move off Google Plus, placing the deadline near the end of August 2019. Meanwhile, the company will launch new features for the enterprise version of the same service as early as this week.

That’s a platform for communication within large companies, built around the same concepts that defined the consumer version of Google Plus. Here, data sharing and conversations can be controlled with detailed privacy restrictions. You don’t want the front-line workers to have insight into the C-suite conversations that move the company’s strategy forward.

The highest-end variant of business-grade Google Plus services will run you $25 per seat, per month. It includes unlimited cloud storage, additional security tools, and multiple levels of data backups. The user experience may be similar to the consumer-level Google Plus service, but the security improvements run deep. Rather than implementing similar safety upgrades for the free service, the consumer version is going away.

What will Google do now?

Google Plus wasn’t Alphabet’s first attempt at challenging Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) and  (NYSE:TWTR) in the social media market, and it certainly won’t be the last. But like so many of its predecessors, Google Plus never really hit the mainstream.

According to a recent Statista survey, Twitter users stick around for nearly three minutes per session. At Facebook, the stickiness increases to roughly five minutes. Alphabet’s review showed that the average user session at Google Plus lasted for less than five seconds.

Alphabet might pivot its social media ambitions toward the Google Hangouts platform, or the company could come up with yet another social network to please the masses. Either way, the social web won’t be Alphabet’s main market for many years to come — if ever.

As an indication of how important Google Plus was to the social network market, Twitter’s and Facebook’s shares rose roughly 0.1% on the news. At the same time,

the S&P 500 market barometer traded exactly sideways. So losing Google Plus as a competitor made a rounding-error difference to investors in the leading social media.


Twitter

If a person sends you a tweet or replies to a tweet with a comment that you don’t like, you can un-follow that person. To stop them from further contacting you, you can block them. If you receive unwanted replies or abuse or threats from someone on Twitter, you can report them direct to Twitter https://support.twitter.com/forms/abusiveuser
You can protect your tweets so that people can only follow you if you approve them first. Do this by going into the ‘settings’ menu, then ‘security and privacy’ and ticking the ‘protect my tweets’ box.
To remove or block someone on Twitter, click on the button with a head icon on it next to the ‘Follow’ button on a user’s profile. When you click on this you will see a menu with the options to ‘block’ the user to prevent them from seeing your profile and you can also ‘report for spam’, which will alert Twitter to any users who are abusing the service.

See the full Twitter report here.


YouTube

If you feel a video you have seen on YouTube is inappropriate, you can ‘flag’ this by clicking on the little flag at the bottom right of the video. YouTube will then look at it to see if it breaks their terms of use. If it does, they will remove it.
YouTube state that videos with hate content, graphic violence or nudity cannot be uploaded so if you see one, report it as inappropriate.
To remove someone from your YouTube page, go to your account page and click on ‘all contacts’ in the ‘Friends and Contacts’ section. Choose which person you wish to un-friend and click on the ‘remove contact’. Once you have done this, the person will no longer be on your ‘share video’ list.
If you receive abusive, bullying or threatening comments on YouTube, you can report them and they will investigate https://www.youtube.com/reportabuse


Instagram

Reporting harassment or bullying on .

If an account is established with the intent of bullying or harassing another person or if a photo or comment is intended to bully or harass someone, please report it. You can also learn what to do if you think someone is pretending to be you or someone else on Instagram.

Once you’ve reported the abuse, consider blocking the person.

Learn how to report other accounts or posts that don’t follow our Community Guidelines.

Bullying or abuse on Instagram can take place in a number of ways:

  • Negative Comments
  • Fake Profiles
  • Hacking Accounts

Instagram’s advice is to block and un-follow the person who is being abusive.
If it continues, you can report it here https://help.instagram.com/165828726894770 or
https://help.instagram.com/contact/584460464982589?helpref=faq_content
To block someone on Instagram, tap their username to open their profile, tap the three dots and press the option to ‘block user’.

Related articles:

See the full Instagram report here.


Snapchat

Report a Safety Concern

If you ever experience harassment, bullying, or any other safety concern, you can always report it right to us. Together we can make a safer place and a stronger community. Report in-app abuse here: https://support.snapchat.com/en-US/article/report-abuse-in-app

To report a Story on Snapchat, just press and hold on the offending Snap until a 🏳️ button appears. Tap it to report the Story and let us know what’s going on.

To report a Snap someone sent you, just press and hold on the Snap until a 🏳️ button appears. Tap it to to report the Snap and let us know what’s going on.

To report a Snapchat account, press and hold on that Snapchatter’s name and tap the ⚙button. Tap ‘Report’ to report the account and let us know what’s going on.

To report a Story on the web from your computer, click the  button on the video, then click ‘Report’. To report a Story on the web from your phone or tablet, tap the  button on the video to report it and let us know what’s going on.

To hide something on Discover, just press and hold a tile on the Discover screen, then tap ‘Hide’ or un-subscribe. You should start to see fewer Snaps like that on your Discover screen.

Note: If you’re unable to report a safety concern in-app, you can still report any issue you run into right on the Snapchat Support site.

Bullying through Snapchat takes place in a number of different ways, including:

  • Taking screen-shots of images without permission
  • Sending pictures without permission
  • Negative comments

If this happens to you, you can block a ‘friend’.

  • Tap the Menu icon
  • Select ‘My Friends’
  • Locate their name in the list and swipe right across their name
  • To delete them, press Delete

To block someone who added you on Snapchat:

  • Tap ‘added me’ on the Profile Screen
  • Tap their name and tap the ‘Wheel Icon’ next to their name
  • Press ‘block’

This will prevent them from sending you Snaps or Chats or from viewing your content.
If a person is bullying or harassing you or you receive an inappropriate image, report it by completing their on-line form https://support.snapchat.com/en-US/i-need-help

If all else fails, you can still contact them via Twitter @snapchatsupport or use their email address moc.pansnull@tahcpans.
Final note: their entire sub-domain support no longer works, or at least it wasn’t working when last we tried. Nor does their email address work – moc.tahcpansnull@troppus is no longer valid. 

A Few Extra Tips:

Rather than rely solely on Snapchat’s report form, there are a few extra things you can do when you’re bullied on Snapchat.

1) Talk to your parents about what’s happening.

2) Save the evidence by taking a screen-shot of the photo or video. The bully will be notified when you do this, but it’s always better to document what you see when you discuss things with a trusted adult. Plus, it encourages people to think before they post.

3) Ask for extra help. Remember that it’s always okay to ask for advice when you need it. Talk to your parents or teacher about what is happening. In addition, every GCC country has a 24/7 hot-line specifically for on-line abuse. You can contact them from this list if you want a professional opinion on what to do.

See the full Snapchat report here.


WhatsApp

Legally, you have to be over 16 to use WhatsApp. As this is a messaging service, bullying can happen in many ways via WhatsApp. Once you install the App, it checks your address book and connects you automatically to anyone else you know who is using the App. You can block and delete a contact who may be bullying you through WhatsApp:

  • Click on their name
  • Using the drop-down menu, choose to ‘block’ the person.

There is way to report in WhatsApp. All you can do is to block them. Then, scroll all the way to the top of the chat history and “block” is on the left hand side where you have “load earlier messages” on an iPhone. Basically, you have 3 options on the top BLOCK EDIT ADD.

You can find out more by emailing WhatsApp at moc.ppastahwnull@troppus and maybe also see their Staying Safe page here.


Some Safety Information

  • Keep it Private – don’t post anything on a social networking site that identifies your real name, address, phone number, school etc. as this will enable a stranger to contact you in real life. Be careful you don’t identify your friends too.
  • Never upload anything that might embarrass you at a later date. Things you post on the Internet stay there and can come back and cause problems for you later on, for instance, when you go for an interview for college or university or apply for a job. If you’re happy for the world to see the photo or comment, hit send. If you’re not, don’t upload it!!! Once you’ve hit send, you have lost control of that image or comment forever.
  • With today’s technology, many of us have a camera available at all times. Never feel pressured into taking pictures of yourself that you wouldn’t want others to see. Always trust your gut instinct over this. As before, once you hit send, you have lost control over that image and this can cause immense anxiety and stress.
  • If you ever use a shared computer, whether it be at home, at school, a library or Internet café, never forget to log off once you have finished your session or when you close the browser. If you don’t, the next user may be able to access the sites you have been using under your name.
  • Many sites enable you to ‘check in’ or post your location each time you post a status update. Whilst this can let your friends know where you are, places you’re visiting and things you might be doing, it can also mean that people you don’t know can also view this information – especially if your profile is public. Go into the ‘Settings’ menu of the social networking site or app, scroll to the ‘Security and Privacy’ section and turn off or un-check the ‘location’ box.

Click buttons below to expand our global reporting links and info

America’s Reporting Section

Get America's bullying reporting links - click to expand or collapse

Most of the info below should alwatys be recent because it came from https://www.stopbullying.gov/, the official bullying website of the United States government. Their website is managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

America’s Bullying Laws & Policies

State and local lawmakers have taken action to prevent bullying and protect children. Through laws (in their state education codes and elsewhere) and model policies (that provide guidance to districts and schools), each state addresses bullying differently. Find out how your state refers to bullying in its laws and what they require on part of schools and districts.

Bullying, cyberbullying, and related behaviors may be addressed in a single law or may be addressed in multiple laws. In some cases, bullying appears in the criminal code of a state that may apply to juveniles.

In December 2010, the U.S. Department of Education developed a framework of common components found in state laws, policies, and regulations focused on bullying at the time. The framework was used to describe how schools were taking action to prevent and respond to bullying incidents. The common components found in state laws, policies, and regulations – which have evolved over time – include definitions of bullying, defining characteristics that are commonly targeted for bullying behaviors, and detailed requirements for school district policies. The table below presents which set of components are addressed in each state’s laws, policies, and regulations, allowing for a quick comparison of how each state compares.  Click on your state below to find out more about your state’s anti-bullying laws and policies and which of the key components they contain.

State Anti-Bullying Laws and Policies map of the United States and Territories

Common Components of State Anti-Bullying Laws and Regulations, by State

States

Prohibiting statement

Definition

Scope

Protected groups

District policy requirement

Reporting and investigations

Consequences

Communication of policy

Safeguards and supports

Review and update of local policies

Prevention education

Staff training

Parent engagement

Alabama

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Arizona

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California

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Colorado

 

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Connecticut

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Georgia

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Louisiana

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Montana

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  1. THERE IS NO FEDERAL LAW THAT SPECIFICALLY APPLIES TO BULLYING. IN SOME CASES, WHEN BULLYING IS BASED ON RACE OR ETHNICITY, COLOR, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, DISABILITY, OR RELIGION*, BULLYING OVERLAPS WITH HARASSMENT AND SCHOOLS ARE LEGALLY OBLIGATED TO ADDRESS IT. READ MORE ABOUT WHEN BULLYING OVERLAPS WITH HARASSMENT AND HOW TO REPORT IT TO THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION’S OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS AND U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE’S CIVIL RIGHTS DIVISION. SEE ALSO FEDERAL LAWS.
  2. TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN LAW, POLICIES AND REGULATIONS, GO TO HTTP://WWW.PUBLICHEALTHLAWCENTER.ORG/SITES/DEFAULT/FILES/RESOURCES/TCLC-FS-LAWS-POLICIES-REGS-COMMONTERMS-2015.PDFexit disclaimer icon

Australia’s Reporting Section

Get Australia's bullying reporting links - click to expand or collapse

Australia: What you can do to stop bullies. Be a supportive bystander: Violence, Harassment and Bullying Fact sheet

If you are being bullied or know or see someone being bullied, it is important that you read this fact sheet to find out how to be a supportive bystander. If you are being bullied and need help please contact a support service.

Send your complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission.

Make a complaint

Complaints to the Australian Human Rights Commission must be in writing. To ensure that all necessary information is provided, we prefer that you complete one of our complaint forms provided below. You can complete and submit a complaint online or you can print a hard copy and send it to us.

If you would like the Commission to send you a hard copy complaint form or if you need assistance to write down your complaint,
please call our National Information Service on 1300 656 419.

You can also contact us via the:

Translating and Interpreting Service: 131 450 or  www.tisnational.gov.au or the

National Relay Service: 1300 555 727 (Speak and Listen) or www.relayservice.gov.au

Electronic complaint forms

Authority to Act

If you are lodging a complaint on behalf of another person, this person will need to provide authorisation for you to act on their behalf. They can do this by completing the attached Authority to Act form, which should be submitted together with the complaint form.

Authority to Act.doc (to be completed electronically)

Authority to Act.pdf (to be completed by hand)

Submitting the complaint form

The complaint form can be submitted by:

  • Post to Director, Investigation and Conciliation Service, Australian Human Rights Commission, GPO Box 5218, Sydney NSW 2001
  • Fax to 02 9284 9611
  • Email to ua.vog.sthgirnamuhnull@ecivresofni

What happens next?

To find out more about the complaint process, please refer to Information for People Making Complaints.

A bystander is someone who sees or knows about bullying or other forms of violence that is happening to someone else.

Bystanders can be either part of the bullying problem or an important part of the solution to stop bullying.

Bystanders can act in different ways when they see or know about bullying:

  1. Some bystanders take the side of the bully by laughing at the victim, encouraging the bully or by passing on text messages or messages on social media sites like Facebook and YouTube
  2. Some bystanders will give silent approval or encourage the bully by looking on
  3. Some bystanders may watch or know about the bullying but don’t do anything. They may not know what to do or are scared. This group of bystanders knows that bullying is not ok.
  4. Some bystanders will be supportive and take safe action to stop the bully, find help or support the victim

Supportive bystanders
Just as we have human rights we also have responsibilities to respect and protect the rights of others. A supportive bystander will take action to protect the rights of others.

A supportive bystander will use words and/or actions that can help someone who is being bullied.

If bystanders are confident to take safe and effective action to support victims then there is a greater possibility that bullying can stop and the person who is bullied can recover.

People respect those that stand up for others who are bullied but being a supportive bystander can be tough. Sometimes it is not easy to work out how to help safely because bullying happens in different ways and places such as online, at work or school.

There is no one size fits all approach to being a supportive bystander.  For supportive bystanders to take safe and effective action here are some suggestions:

  • Make it clear to your friends that you won’t be involved in bullying behaviour
  • Never stand by and watch or encourage bullying behaviour
  • Do not harass, tease or spread gossip about others, this includes on social networking sites like Facebook
  • Never forward on or respond to messages or photos that may be offensive or upsetting
  • Support the person who is being bullied to ask for help e.g. go with them to a place they can get help or provide them with information about where to go for help
  • Report it to someone in authority or someone you trust e.g. at school to a teacher, or a school counsellor; at work to a manager; if the bullying is serious, report it to the police; if the bullying occurs on Facebook, report it to Facebook.

Get Help
If you have been bullied or witnessed others been bullied and need help contact:

Kids Help Line
(1800 55 1800) is a free and confidential, telephone counseling service for 5 to 25 year olds in Australia. http://www.kidshelp.com.au/

Lifeline
(13 11 14) is a free and confidential service staffed by trained telephone counsellors. http://www.lifeline.org.au

The Australian Human Rights Commission (1300 656 419) has a complaint handling service that may investigate complaints of discrimination, harassment and bullying http://www.humanrights.gov.au/complaints_information/index.html

Other useful resources

Download the Cyber-safety Help Button, a free Australian Government initiative, designed to keep children and families safe online.

http://www.dcbde.gov.au/helpbutton

To find out about cyberbullying and how to get help you can also go to the

Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) Cybersmart Program

http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/report.aspx

National Centre Against Bullying

http://www.ncab.org.au

The Australian Human Rights Commission has information on cyber racism and actions that can be taken to report cyber racism.

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/racial_discrimination/publications/cyberracism_factsheet.html

Think U Know conducts internet safety programs and provides advice for teachers,parents and carers.

http://www.thinkuknow.org.au/search/node?keys=bully

Bullying No Way provides support and information for school communities.

http://www.bullyingnoway.com.au/


Australia workplace bullying: Violence, Harassment and Bullying Fact sheet

What is workplace bullying?

Workplace bullying is verbal, physical, social or psychological abuse by your employer (or manager), another person or group of people at work.

Workplace bullying can happen in any type of workplace, from offices to shops, cafes, restaurants, workshops, community groups and government organisations.

Workplace bullying can happen to volunteers, work experience students, interns, apprentices, casual and permanent employees.

Some types of workplace bullying are criminal offences. If you have experienced violence, assault and stalking you can report it directly to the police.

What does bullying in the workplace look like?

  • repeated hurtful remarks or attacks, or making fun of your work or you as a person (including your family, sex, sexuality, gender identity, race or culture, education or economic background)
  • sexual harassment, particularly stuff like unwelcome touching and sexually explicit comments and requests that make you uncomfortable
  • excluding you or stopping you from working with people or taking part in activities that relates to your work
  • playing mind games, ganging up on you, or other types of psychological harassment
  • intimidation (making you feel less important and undervalued)
  • giving you pointless tasks that have nothing to do with your job
  • giving you impossible jobs that can’t be done in the given time or with the resources provided
  • deliberately changing your work hours or schedule to make it difficult for you
  • deliberately holding back information you need for getting your work done properly
  • pushing, shoving, tripping, grabbing you in the workplace
  • attacking or threatening with equipment, knives, guns, clubs or any other type of object that can be turned into a weapon
  • initiation or hazing – where you are made to do humiliating or inappropriate things in order to be accepted as part of the team.

How bullying can affect your work

If you are being bullied at work you might:

  • be less active or successful
  • be less confident in your work
  • feel scared, stressed, anxious or depressed
  • have your life outside of work affected, e.g. study, relationships
  • want to stay away from work
  • feel like you can’t trust your employer or the people who you work with
  • lack confidence and happiness about yourself and your work
  • have physical signs of stress like headaches, backaches, sleep problems

What is not workplace bullying

Some practices in the workplace may not seem fair but are not bullying.

Your employer is allowed to transfer, demote, discipline, counsel, retrench or sack you (as long as they are acting reasonably).

What you need to know if you are being bullied at work

When you are being bullied it’s important that you know there are things you can do and people who can help.

You have the right to be in a safe workplace free from violence, harassment and bullying.

Bullying and abuse

If you are under 16 years old, bullying and violence may also be child abuse. See the Lawstuff topic on child abuse under your state or territory for more information. http://www.lawstuff.org.au/lawstuff

Bullying and discrimination

Bullying may also be discrimination if it is because of your age, sex, pregnancy, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion or certain other reasons. Sexual harassment and racial hatred are also against the law. For more information on what anti-discrimination laws cover, and what you can do about it, look at the Australian Human Rights Commission page

Responsibility of employers

Your employer has a responsibility under Occupational Health and Safety and anti-discrimination law to provide a safe workplace. Employers have a duty of care for your health and wellbeing whilst at work. An employer that allows bullying to occur in the workplace is not meeting this responsibility.

Responsibility of bystanders

We all have a moral responsibility to help create a positive, safe workplace.  If someone in your workplace is experiencing harassment or bullying, you can tell them about the steps they can take to solve it.

What you can do if you are being bullied at work

Make sure you’re informed. Check to see if your workplace has a bullying policy and complaints procedure.

Keep a diary. Documenting everything that happens, including what you’ve done to try stopping it. This can help if you make a complaint.

Get support from someone you trust or contact support services.  Even if you don’t know anyone you can talk to, there are support services which are immediately available to help and support you in the Get Help section. This includes contacting your union

Approach the bully. If you feel safe and confident, you can approach the person who is bullying you and tell them that their behaviour is unwanted and not acceptable. If you are unsure how to approach them, you might be able to get advice from an appointed contact person, or from a colleague or manager.

Tell someone at your work. Your workplace will usually have a process for making a complaint and resolving disputes, which might include a warning, requiring the bully to have counselling, a mediation process, or even firing the bully if the situation continues. The person to talk to might be your supervisor/manager, a harassment contact officer, or a health and safety representative (if your work has one).

Get information and advice. If the bullying is serious, if the situation has not changed after complaining to your manager, or if there is not anyone you can safely talk to at work you can get outside information and advice.

Using the links below you can contact:

  • your workplace health and safety authority to get advice and report bullying incidents
  • the Australian Human Rights Commission to get advice, or to make a complaint about discrimination, harassment and bullying covered by anti-discrimination law
  • the union representing your industry who can give you advice on your options and your rights
  • Lawstuff for legal information especially for young people

Make a formal complaint to the state and territory workplace health and safety authority or to the Australian Human Rights Commission, using the links below.

Getting Help

If you have made a complaint to your manager or others in your workplace and there have not been adequate steps taken to stop the bullying there are a number of options that you can take to get help.

When to contact the police

If bullying is violent or threatening it may be a criminal offense and you should contact the police immediately call 000

If the situation in not urgent you can call 131 444 for all states and territories except for Victoria where you will need to visit your local police station.

Making a complaint about workplace bullying to the Australian Human Rights Commission 

If you are been bullied, harassed or discriminated against because of your race, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion or because you have a disability or are pregnant you can contact the Australian Human Rights Commission. Call 1300 656 419

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/complaints_information/young_people.html

The Commonwealth Fairwork Ombudsman can provide information and advice about Australia’s workplace rights and rules and the protection you have against harassment and discrimination.  Call  131394 http://www.fairwork.gov.au/resources/best-practice-guides/Pages/a-guide-for-young-workers.aspx

Report bullying to a State or Territory work health and safety authority

Your boss has a duty to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of all their employees. You can report bullying incidences to the following state and territory work health and safety authorities.

Australian Capital Territory

New South Wales

Northern Territory

  • NT Worksafe can provide advice and help if you are experiencing workplace bullying. Call 1800 019 115
  • http://www.worksafe.nt.gov.au/Search/Results.aspx?k=bullying

South Australia

Victoria

Queensland

Western Australia

Tasmania

  • WorkSafe Tas can provide advice and help if you are experiencing workplace bullying. Call 1300 366 322 (within Tasmania) or(03) 6166 4600 (outside Tasmania)
  • http://worksafe.tas.gov.au/bullying

Other useful links

  • Lawstuff. To find out about the rights and responsibilities of you and your employer visit the Lawstuff website, click on your state or territory, and go to the ‘on the job’ section
  • Unions Australia. You can get advice on workplace bullying from the Workers helpline 1300 486 466
  • To learn more about your rights at work see the Australian Council of Trade Unions website for students http://www.worksite.actu.org.au/
Get Worldwide bullying reporting links - click to expand or collapse

Works in progress!